Jump to content

MrToad

Community user
  • Content Count

    122
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    5

Everything posted by MrToad

  1. I had the same problem with the turbo security (trying serrated nuts etc. to solve the loosening problem) which was made worse by only limited access under the T3 turbo. Final solution was to get the faces of the exhaust/turbo seating machined so that no gasket was required(original specification) and using "nord lock washers" to hold everything in position. This has finally seemed to have done the trick, the only drawback is that the Nord system stretches the thread when undoing and therefore needs the studs to be replaced when remove, but better than turbo breaking loose.
  2. MrToad

    Engine rebuild

    I have read and heard plenty of things about the Cosworth engines but never boring! Personally rebuilding and fitting this Iconic engine was far from boring!
  3. MrToad

    Engine rebuild

    Why not proper job it and fit Cosworth lol, potential bhp figures in 4 figures even cooking they exceed 300lbft and 300bhp from 2000rpm
  4. I second this as the wiring is a minefield and it's better to use details that somebody else has put together than fully start from scratch. I took the route of following the Ford wiring and now all the colours/uses roughly follow the Haynes schematics the difficulty for me was that the original loom was Ghia spec. so had many sections that were superfluous to requirements(there are still relays that do nothing but i'm too scared to remove). My engine wiring was easy as it just overlaid the Sierra so just followed separate details. As my kit was Westfield I could have used their loom which was much simpler and in hindsight may have been a better bet, certainly easier. My wiring however took a few years to complete as I had little spare time whilst working and trusted the job to so called experts(3) who messed things up, took ages and stung me for bodged work, since retiring I completed the work.
  5. I put carbs but most engines from single cylinder mowers to multi-cylinder giants use the vacuum from the intake to make adjustments to running criteria especially the ecu which will sense any leaks and adjust the mixture, if you have a turbo there will be more. Mine feeds to at least 6+ locations and I have had to put small fuel type clamps on each to ensure adequate sealing as the turbo deals out positive pressure as well as negative vacuum. As Alan has a similar set up his knowledge will be invaluable.
  6. Sounds like a possible leak in the intake side of the engine. Check all the vacuum tubes for leaks, make sure carb and intake manifold are properly fastened down. I made up my own smoke box using air conditioning system smoke pellets, found leaks where I didn't expect them. Air leaks will cause the engine to run faster at tick over due to more air being allowed in than the carb controls, also makes mixture extra lean so will be harder to start, plus will make the mixture wrong all over making general running erratic.
  7. Sounds like a plan, good luck with engine it will be a great unit and impressive motor.
  8. I had a Puma with the 1.7 engine, the engine of which was produced under license by Yamaha. This engine was fantastically rev hungry and was smooth and ran like a sewing machine. Being bought in by Ford the Puma in this version lost on every sale and is the reason why they replaced it with the much cheaper 1.6 Ford engine. The 1.7 is a great engine, especially if you can get hold of the high tune version, the costs for tuning and maintaining are more so it may be better to consider the bigger Ford alternatives.
  9. MrToad

    Battery power

    The injectors need a constant pressure to allow controlled fuel flow by the ecu, if that pressure is low the spray pattern will be affected meaning that petrol will only dribble into the cylinder and be harder for the spark plug to ignite. With this the engine will have to churn over more to get fuel to be vapourised enough to start, also on start an engine needs the fuel air ratio to be over rich for initial start, ecu's now control this evident by faster running when cold etc. Good old carbs used to need a choke control or holding the accelerator pedal down among other techniques. With the engine running ok when started the fuel pressure may be enough to maintain operation but not for start up, as suggested a simple fuel pressure test will either prove or eliminate this function.
  10. MrToad

    Battery power

    Newer engine management regimes stop the starter from working if battery is not up to the task, yours is the other way round so I'd be surprised if the battery is the problem. However if the battery is only holding charge for a few turns it may be time to buy a new one. If you have fuel injection the pump should pressure up the system to the injectors immediately you turn on the ignition, so the engine should start within a few turns. If it takes a lot of turning it could be insufficient fuel pressure. Not a hard job to test with a pressure gauge readily and cheaply available on-line. My regulator was shot and the gauge showed this up immediately. If you are running a higher compression engine this will affect the starting crank speed of the starter and maybe a higher ampere rating battery is required. If you have carbs the engine may require more turning due to getting fuel into the carb(s) but not excessively, I would suggest a pressure test to ensure fuel line is working correctly.
  11. MrToad

    IVA spec worries

    Ok to the wiper nut, mine had a side bolt and I covered the same way - no problem. I changed my silencer to a folded edge version to be sure. 2.5mm radius rule applies, but also the IVA ball end test tool. Quick temporary fixes could be to apply some exhaust paste round the inner rim - I know pretty pathetic but will cover the rules if done neatly, or get some thin stainless and bend round the edge - will take a bit of skill and perseverance.
  12. MrToad

    IVA spec worries

    Good idea from fry61 and would easily satisfy the IVA requirements. My edges were glass fibre so I did a fix for the tester using 15mm copper tube bent round to suit, I needed something to transmit the heat quickly away as the exhaust can get rather hot from the turbo and Westfield bodywork is all resin plastic.
  13. Webber carbs are usually fixed jet units and as long as you take your time using corrosion release fluid on all threads there is not a lot you can do wrong, there are plenty of exploded diagrams on the subject and if you fancy a laugh watch one of the you tube displays and see how not to do it The smoke issue is visual and my tester was quite relaxed about it only having issues with continuous black smoke, which mine did on the initial visit due to leaking vacuum pipes, next visit was ok even though on revs it did puff a little.
  14. With the carb if it's been unused for a while the whole unit will need to be overhauled and cleaned. You can buy service kits for very little money that include jets, gaskets etc. and will be best done as a bench process using suitable cleaning fluid (petrol ok). Once it's all nice and clean set the mixture screw(s) as the manufacturers starting setting, fit, then gradually screw in or out as required till smooth running. Do not be tempted to make large adjustments as if this is required something will be wrong with the carb or other things elsewhere, usually 1/2 a turn in either direction from the initial setting will be plenty.
  15. MrToad

    IVA spec worries

    richyb66 is right the fuel cap will be an issue both at the front and rear of the filler, get a replacement cap that is IVA acceptable and put a collar around the filler pipe to cover up the underside. My tester failed mine on the space around the exhaust pipe which was less than yours and required a radius on the edges, this had to be metal as the heat from the exhaust would compromise rubber and because he wanted to see it as a permanent solution. His explanation also was that a pedestrian could catch their fingers in the opening, extreme chance but within reason what he said I had to agree with. Again the question of side repeaters is valid although the photo only shows part of the cycle front guard, favourite position now is on the outside of the guard as they have to be at the widest point close to the front (actual dimensions as rule).
  16. MrToad

    IVA spec worries

    Hi Not sure on weights but someone on here will know. Any edges with a radius of less than 2.5mm need to be protected so protect round the exhaust, the front suspension is a bit of a grey area as they have an exclusion zone in this area but for the sake of it put rubber over edge - minimal cost and effort. The bonnet gap should not be a problem as the edges are radiused anyway and the IVA ball test should show no concerns. I would be tempted to shim with rubber the reverse light as very little effort to ensure compliance. Only rule with front fog lights is if you have them they must work correctly, if you have fitted some take them off for the IVA. You must have rear fog light(s) which must only come on with dipped headlights so from the Sierra wiring you will have to put in some diodes to control, there is plenty of information on previous forums showing the procedure so just refer - this worked well on mine. Belt and braces job with external projections - check everything and if in any doubt cover it! Any nuts/bolts - plastic covers, cycle mudguards - edge rubber, track rod adjuster - cover, edges 2.5mm or less - cover, exhaust edges with radius less than 2.5mm - protect and remember they will be checking from rear/side/front so any edge applicable. For the sake of a few £ and a little time it's worth it.Fuel cap must be tethered. Displaying a bit of thought and professionalism goes a long way in the IVA testers opinion.
  17. I feel that fuel pressure regulators only work properly with twin fuel lines(feed and return) allowing the pressure(feed) side to vary the amount of fuel flow but keep the pressure high enough for adequate supply, also this is an injector requirement rather than carbs. With a single fuel line the regulator must be before the carb and therefore can't be doing anything other than what a correct pressure pump would do. A well sorted carb will take the pressure advised by the manufacturer which I would have thought will be in the 1 to 2 bar range, my engine has a regulator set at 3.5 bar but it is injected and turbo. I have also found to my cost that cheap fuel pumps are a nightmare failing on a regular basis, I am now back to a high pressure Bosch unit which has been reliable and from people in the know the electric pump of choice for the road.
  18. I used short lengths of braided rubber at engine and tank ends to absorb any movement and the rest I also routed along the transmission tunnel in plastic coated copper. It's very strong bends easily and fittings are plentiful, I also used it to make sure approved by IVA. Additionally as I'm running Fuel injection I have 2 runs, feed and return. Easily handles the pressure as I had a blockage and gauge read 10 bar without the hint of a leak. If running through trans tunnel make sure to give enough room around the gearbox, I had to put through steel tube to make sure as tolerance was small (I had routed the tubes under the floor at the front but transporting on trailer flattened them - hence the blockage).
  19. MrToad

    Electric water pump

    I think I should have taken more attention when doing "fluid flows" at college, not that at this age I could remember what I did at college. I see that I will just have to bite the bullet and try out some locations, keeping a check and reverting when necessary. As said I don't need a lot of flow through the radiators just enough to circulate when at rest, probably a winter project.
  20. MrToad

    Electric water pump

    Hi phaeton, I was wondering if this way as well. So your friend fitted with effectively a lay-by, however wouldn't the flow take the route of least resistance? I'm so paranoid about affecting the flows on what is a complex system that seems otherwise to be working well and I'm loath to fit a non return valve with their restrictions and failure record. I have fitted a Davies Craig pump in the cooling line from the header tank(directly fed from the turbo) and this then feeds through a small non fan radiator back to the bottom hose but it's not reducing the cooling time, I think it's following the route of least resistance back through the main pump and through the turbo again.
  21. MrToad

    Electric water pump

    Thank you all for your input I will have to do some investigations. The problem with the OEM pumps is finding out the hose diameter, I suppose a trip to a breakers is the ideal solution. theduck - thanks for this info, what size are the hose tails? I'd like to insert it into the bottom hose which is 32mm. My system is automatically set for the sensor to keep the fan going until under 82 degrees, I have this sensor in the hose close to the thermostat, I have been advised by another mechanic that it would be better in the bottom hose but I have had other advise otherwise. I have fitted a smaller Craig Davies 16mm pump into the system and although I have it on the turbo circuit it bypasses the main system not affecting the cooling of the fan.
  22. MrToad

    Electric water pump

    Exactly my thoughts
  23. Good Luck on move. Gear yourself up to the sudden change of pace lol.
  24. Hi, I need to source an electric water pump for my radiator system as my radiators are remotely sited down the side of the chassis. Everything is running fine and temperature is well under control however when I stop the ecu continues the fan going until the engine has cooled to 82 degrees(quite a long time), as the radiators are off to the side they get cool very quickly but the engine remains hot. Engine is Cosworth YB with T3 turbo and large intercooler taking the position in the front so I don't really want to fit a front fan. Has anyone any recommendations of a pump that will fit in the main hose whilst keeping the mechanical unit?
  25. MrToad

    Starting problem

    I have found that my engine/ecu works best with basic spark plugs in my case NGK BCR8ES and when I have tried to use the expensive options it misfires and carbons up - my tuner has said that he has found that some times this is the case and depends greatly on the mapping criterias. The other problem I had was that the spark plug was passing current along the outside of the ceramic casing - try fully cleaning outside of plugs, clean connections to leads and lubricate with GT85/WD40 or similar insulating compound to make sure no jumping of spark can occur. Some sheath the spark plugs with thin silicone tubing to assist with this. It may not be the answer but it is a simple cheap try to cure the problem.
×
×
  • Create New...