Jump to content
nelmo

Brake Lines

Recommended Posts

If you use a decent small flaring tool, most of the flares can be formed on the car.

I will go on the bay now and get a number for you to compare type with your own.

Good spot Ian. I was looking through the poste to see if anyone had mentioned this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

eBay item 161436978155 is a really good one for on car situations. Made from tool steel not Chinese or Indian type pig iron.

311677453989 are a no no. They are so flexible the very rarely form a perfect flare. Always use a tiny bit of rubber grease at the start of each flare and when starting the stage two of the flare. Any decent tool will have some with it. If not, use the type as you use on the cylinder seals when you are re-knitting brake Calipers or cylinders. (red)

Ian. I was always taught double flares on any joint.

For the extra time needed to form one the safety aspect outweighs the risk of not doing so.

 

Can you tell me of one manufacture red car that doesn't do this. I don't know of one.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for your help - really useful and I guess it's better to find this out now than at 70mph or IVA :(

 

Is it OK to leave the single flare joints (so the ones in the MC and in the rear 4-way) as they are male ends or would it be better to do them double's anyway?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Craig.

Not starting any kind of war.

I won't mention paragraph 3 of your post. Or what happens to the double flare when a male fitting meets the convect form of the original fitting. You could always do the same operation tool 1 for a third operation though. ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To answer post 20 pull all the b----y pipes off and redo PROPERLY ! ,Its not just your life !! you might run in to me ! OK this is a bit fierce but brakes and steering are not to be messed with at any time :aggressive: :acute: Mick

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also unless you use a banjo fitting on the caliper how are you going to screw a single flexible pipe in. If you screw it into the MC then you would have to take the caliper off and turn it round to screw the pipe in as you can't turn the pipe. If it seats with the csliper upside-down you would have to put a twist in the pipe when you refit (not the biggest problem over a long run but best to keep untwisted as poss)

 

I think the comment about iva was mainly that although it might be legal (and safe?) to do so an examiner might find it odd and start along the lines of 'if they cant do this properly what else is wrong' and will pick holes in everything.

 

In all honesty I've done single flares on my car which by the sounds of it I shouldn't. Although its been fine in the 9 years since I built it and The new flairing tool I bought the other day had a guide which said about double flares but they were only on certain situations.

 

As above though brake pipe is cheap yours or another's life is not. If I had to spend money on going or stopping it would be on the stopping 😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was always taught that you looked at the end you were joining the pipe to, if it was a single flare you made up a double flare to join it and vice versa. I agree with Mower Man do not take any risks with brakes if you are not sure get someone in to advise you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we are getting a little lost in terminology. Single and double flares, DIN/ISO bubble flares, male and female flares and fittings. I have always used the terms male and female to describe the flare, male having a convex mating surface and female a concave surface. Male flares are also described as DIN or ISO bubble flares. For female flares, single or double refers to the layers of metal, one or two, in the flares. In my experience female single flares are intended for low pressure lines, not high pressure brake lines which if a female end is needed should be double flares. Examples below.

 

Nigel

post-21-0-91229600-1476520080_thumb.jpg

Edited by Longboarder
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

whilst i am not argueing against using the double female flare. All of the steel brakelines i took of the sierra were single. Is that because they were steel and therefore ok or because it was ok at the time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely not. Read post 23 and the link.

I've never yet seen any single flares on car manufacturers cars yet.

It's no real effort, cost or time to do them the safe way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely not. Read post 23 and the link.

I've never yet seen any single flares on car manufacturers cars yet.

It's no real effort, cost or time to do them the safe way.

 

ah maybe i didn't look closely enough they were pretty much always covered in oil and crud. will definitely look at the double flare

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weight still be 90' flare that looks single but actually has been double flared.

Use step one at step 3 to form the 90' single look flare or,a,bleed nipple.

Do not overdo it as you can split the flare where it folds.

Loose looking crease will be fine as log as whatever joiner fits inside it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...