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nelmo

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nelmo last won the day on June 19

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  • Car type
    GBS Zero
  • Full name
    Neil Hammond

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  • Website URL
    https://zerolifebuild.blogspot.co.uk/

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Surrey

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  1. Yeah, I was going to say, that looks like a Westfield GRP body they've tried to fit on that chassis which was designed for metal panels.
  2. My IVA guy never asked for a single photo - I would imagine those ones are enough if they do ask. However, a lot to do to get that to IVA standard (those headlight fittings may have to go, for starters ). The full manual is here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/iva-manual-for-vehicle-category-m1 A lot of it isn't relevant to a kit car but one of the main things are 'sharp edges' - IVA is very keen that any human body you've hit doesn't then get a scratch (as it's flying through the air) from a 'sharp' edge. So you'll need lots of rubber trim in various areas. Also, seatbelts are a common failure point, usually the strength of the lower mountings and where they are bolted into. You will not pass the IVA first time (very few do unless you pay someone like GBS a small fortune to do it for you), so don't stress getting it perfect. Worth just doing the initial test, getting the list of failure items and then working on those (re-test is £95 and you can do as many as you want/need). What is good is that you have a Mazda engine which is a major bonus - decent engine that. Hopefully, you've also got the Mazda gearbox which is excellent.
  3. Yeah, I'm afraid so - effectively, you've got an almost-complete kit which has never been officially tested (IVA) and thus never registered. Quite common for kits to be sold at that stage - IVA test costs £450 and there is a shed-load of confusing paperwork after that to get it registered.
  4. You're going to have to put it through IVA then, then get it registered. https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-registration/kitbuilt-vehicles
  5. I'll give it a go - what could possibly go wrong?
  6. Annoyingly, it's tapered but around 15mm...I was thinking of a load of penny washers covered in a piece of bicycle inner tube rubber - does that sound stupid?
  7. It's always been like this since I did my build 5 years ago. The prop was provided by GBS, so hopefully it was correctly balanced? Below is the quickshift mechanism - as you can see, lots of potential for vibration with all those long lengths dangling... I was really looking for some sort of weight I can bolt onto the lever, just above that rose joint.
  8. nelmo

    Number application

    IVA manual says it can be welded as long as the weld goes all the way round...
  9. My gear lever vibrates a lot (GBS quickshift) - can anyone suggest some sort of weight I can attach to the lever to dampen the vibrations? Searched online but can't find anything suitable...
  10. nelmo

    Number application

    I doubt the IVA guy will be that bothered...the VIN number in my tintop is under the windscreen on the left of the car, for example.
  11. Sorry, I didn't mean to panic you... Are you planning on doing any of the work yourself? Labour is the most expensive part of any work - I spent around 200 hours building my car and many more since I finished it, on repairs and upgrades. And I'm afraid to say, the last push to IVA was the most labour-intensive, getting all the little details done (look at my blog for examples - link in the sig below). So if you can do the work yourself, it will be MUCH cheaper and easier. If you find a pro, he'll charge, what, £50-£100 per hour? Quite rightly as it is his day job but it's expensive for you.
  12. I hid the post so no-one clicks on the dodgy link....
  13. nelmo

    Number application

    Don't worry about that first point - it gets checked at IVA. For the plate itself, get the VIN engraved onto a metal plate (I literally took the metal piece to a key cutting shop) and then weld it on to the chassis somewhere visible/accessible. Mine was welded to the rail that the bonnet sits on (GBS leave a gap in the side panel especially for this), so very easy to see. (I would like to point out that I don't weld - a kind member (thanks Bob) did it for me ).
  14. You can't add a location unless you're a paid-up member... Ah, those 'it only needs a few tweaks to get it through IVA' adverts - I really hope that is right but if it was that easy, why didn't the original guy do it and then sell the car for much more?
  15. I have a 2L engine which was a new crate engine when the car was registered in 2017. On my V5, the CO2 field is blank. On the 2 MOTs I've done so far, both testers just did a smoke test. One guy was just lazy and the other couldn't get the sensor far enough up the exhaust to get a reading. In theory, emissions tests are done on the year of the plate, not the year it was registered; the car may be registered in 2016 but may have an age-related plate, in which case it should be tested against the emission standards of that year. I doubt there will be any difference between a 1.6 and a 2L.
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