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Complete numbskull rookie error - sheered bolt in flywheel


zhap135
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So, as the engine was leaking water from behind the sump did a bit of research and decided that it was probably a core plug gone - got the kit, whipped engine out, took the clutch/flywheel off found a very rotten core plug, cleaned hole, replaced nae bother.

 

Trouble was in the process I managed to sheer a clutch bolt. To add to the drama I also managed to break an extractor, and then a drill when trying to go in from the other side 😡😤. So now I have a very stubborn bolt/drill/extractor chimera  embedded on my flywheel, that has defeated several drills

Yes, shame and hot coals heaped on my head!

Does anyone happen to have any advice. The obvious easy solution, but rather pricey,  is get a new flywheel. Is there any other hope?...

Edited by zhap135
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A mate with a fine torch on oxy-acetalene should be able to take all the temper out of the broken bits & then re-tap next size up -- maybe?

Or spark erosion ??

Edited by fry61
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Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, fry61 said:

A mate with a fine torch on oxy-acetalene should be able to take all the temper out of the broken bits & then re-tap next size up -- maybe?

Or spark erosion ??

Aaargh. Had a full on acetylene kit, or my dad did, bit I got rid when clearing his stuff. Have been kicking myself ever since...

Isn't the hardness from the carbon content rather than the temper? I'm kicking myself on the extractor I used too. It snapped at the head with hardly any effort - piece of crap. The others in the set went straight into the bin!

Spark erosion. I suppose that's another option is find and engineering company to see if they can help out.

 

Edited by zhap135
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12 minutes ago, sylvia.fry2 said:

Or plasma cutter -- back in the day my little one made short work of cutting through steel -- but only thin 2mm stuff.

That's an interesting point. I've not used one before. What is the risk of damaging the fly around the hole do you think?

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It was a very accurate cut -- but the parent edge was very hard slag which was best chipped off before dressing smooth; no idea how this type would perform on a flywheel.

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On an episode of Wheeler Dealers (US) Ant Anstead manages to shear 3 bolts  he can be seen using a TIG welder to carefully add metal to the sheared end until there is enough to grip and turn. In his case the stumps are still a little proud of the surface. However rather than throw away the flywheel you could try this technique. What can happen ? if you are lucky, the weld will only take to the stump of the bolt because of the big thermal conductivity in the main body of the flywheel the bolt metal will melt first. If you are unlucky you might as well just really fill the hole with weld and then try drilling it out again, starting with with a very small diameter drill through the centre. Could use remaining bolts to mount the clutch housing to accurately center the drill in the housing hole. Here is a link to Ant's efforts.

https://www.facebook.com/DiscoveryUK/videos/ant-removes-broken-studs-wheeler-dealers/250798119707281/

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Think I have a 2l flywheel tucked away if you get stuck, (better check), and I'm not too far away.

The welding technique works well if you can do it, the heat breaks the rust free.

Edited by Peter Bell
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I had some bolts in a dodge v8 head which had rusted away so that there was no head left. An engineer I knew ground off the rust and then got a scrap bolt and attached it with a couple of zaps of a welder and turned them out with a spanner. Some took a couple of goes as the weld broke but they all came out in short order. Probably bigger bolts than yours though. 

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Some great videos on eBay to extract studs. Include using coper pipe!

You cannot beat drills, but you need good quality cobalt drill bits and not Aldi specials!

Edited by MarkBzero
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23 hours ago, Peter Bell said:

Think I have a 2l flywheel tucked away if you get stuck, (better check), and I'm not too far away.

The welding technique works well if you can do it, the heat breaks the rust free.

Thanks, I might take you up on that if I get no luck with a repair

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Posted (edited)
20 hours ago, MarkBzero said:

Some great videos on eBay to extract studs. Include using coper pipe!

You cannot beat drills, but you need good quality cobalt drill bits and not Aldi specials!

Thanks yes have been trawling YT for some wisdom. Yes, although I have never sunk as low as Aldi for drills, I'm realising I'm going to have to spend more than I have been! Is there any particular supplier you use? I'm always wary on eBay that you don't really know what you are getting, and you can't go by price alone.

Edited by zhap135
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22 hours ago, kevin the chicken said:

I had some bolts in a dodge v8 head which had rusted away so that there was no head left. An engineer I knew ground off the rust and then got a scrap bolt and attached it with a couple of zaps of a welder and turned them out with a spanner. Some took a couple of goes as the weld broke but they all came out in short order. Probably bigger bolts than yours though. 

Thanks Kevin, yes I'm starting to realise I need to get a welder and learn how to use it!

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On 5/2/2021 at 10:10 AM, Sparepart said:

On an episode of Wheeler Dealers (US) Ant Anstead manages to shear 3 bolts  he can be seen using a TIG welder to carefully add metal to the sheared end until there is enough to grip and turn. In his case the stumps are still a little proud of the surface. However rather than throw away the flywheel you could try this technique. What can happen ? if you are lucky, the weld will only take to the stump of the bolt because of the big thermal conductivity in the main body of the flywheel the bolt metal will melt first. If you are unlucky you might as well just really fill the hole with weld and then try drilling it out again, starting with with a very small diameter drill through the centre. Could use remaining bolts to mount the clutch housing to accurately center the drill in the housing hole. Here is a link to Ant's efforts.

https://www.facebook.com/DiscoveryUK/videos/ant-removes-broken-studs-wheeler-dealers/250798119707281/

Thanks for that, that's really useful

I haven't welded before, but I've been meaning to get a welder for years. Is there a particular unit that's good for starting out?

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I fear that you are opening a Pandora's box with that question. I have learned to weld after a fashion by trial and many many many errors. In retrospect what I should have done was to take the time and expense to have proper instruction.  As you know there are three main types, Arc, Mig and TIG.  I "started out" with an Arc welder because there is less complication, just the welder and welding sticks and mask and gauntlets and apron to buy. However I soon found that arc welding is more of an art than a science, one needs to understand so much about how air is kept from the molten metal during the welding process, not only the physical movement of the welding stick but also the chemical composition of the flux and its relationship to the type and thickness of the metals that are being welded AND taking into account the temperature of the weld. It is VERY hard to weld thin metal with an Arc welder. Also I never got to try and purchase Stainless Steel welding sticks which I assume are expensive. Basically I GAVE UP with the Arc welder. Then I purchased a Mig welder, Clarke 135TE from Machine Mart. Although it is more complicated, wire spools, gas cannisters etc I have found it so much easier than Arc welding, once the correct wire speed, current and gas flow has been set up. TIG welding is yet a mistery to me, involves coordinated movements of two hands, one holds the tungsten tipped arc generator that gives high temp and the other feeds a metal rod into the molten pool that forms the weld. So I would say your are best to start with a MIG welder and I advise you to get some instruction, or get a load of scrap metal on which to practise. Oh yes, also, some of the welders out there require more that a 13 amp power connection, beware.

 

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