Jump to content

HELP Required


Kking1988
 Share

Recommended Posts

That is right, my donor was a later model and uses a different wiring diagram. My indicators have the click of the relay but no other audible sound. Not sure anything else is required.

Horn is the next thing for me to wire up. Can't remember if I have a relay for the holder or if I need to source one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Random said:

That is right, my donor was a later model and uses a different wiring diagram. My indicators have the click of the relay but no other audible sound. Not sure anything else is required.

Horn is the next thing for me to wire up. Can't remember if I have a relay for the holder or if I need to source one.

Yeah, the horn relay is clicking, but for some reason not sounding. The wires are heavy enough not to need a relay - as mine I believe is not a high series model it looks from the haynes/ford wiring diagrams like I can wire direct. Think I'll do that.

The relay on the inds doesn't click nor when the hazards are on, but they do work otherwise. I haven't got the side repeaters wires in yet. I guess it's possible that as they will draw a bit more current there'll be a more positive click? Not sure, might have to wait until that's done to investigate. There'll be some kind of workaround available if I still have that problem I'm sure. I could stand behind the inspector and click my tongue I suppose.....

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My indicators don’t auto cancel so I spent a lot of time driving with the indicators on.  So I fitted an industrial strength buzzer (I am told you can hear it from 50yds away) and a high intensity LED right in my eyeline.  Result, no more driving with them on.  In fact my MOT tester said they were the best he had seen 😀  The only downside is that they draw so much current that if one of the main bulbs fail there is no indication as there is with a normal setup where the indicators go double time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The horn is probably the exception to hot switching, all ford models that I have seen from the late 70s used a relay for the horn.

If the relay clicks but the horn does not sound then check that the horn body is properly earthed by its mounting bolts. Then check the horn fuse.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, IanS said:

The horn is probably the exception to hot switching, all ford models that I have seen from the late 70s used a relay for the horn.

If the relay clicks but the horn does not sound then check that the horn body is properly earthed by its mounting bolts. Then check the horn fuse.

Thanks Ian - the wiring diagram suggest no relay on the early low series sierras. The weight of the horn wire into the switch would suggest the same.- the relay that I have is in the CBS module. Good point about the fuse though,  will check and make sure that it's not a schoolboy error

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, alanrichey said:

My indicators don’t auto cancel so I spent a lot of time driving with the indicators on.  So I fitted an industrial strength buzzer (I am told you can hear it from 50yds away) and a high intensity LED right in my eyeline.  Result, no more driving with them on.  In fact my MOT tester said they were the best he had seen 😀  The only downside is that they draw so much current that if one of the main bulbs fail there is no indication as there is with a normal setup where the indicators go double time.

Great idea on that, will look to doing something similar!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Bob Tucker said:

Check that the horn switch can handle the high load of a horn without a relay.

I hope so, it's teh original paddle and wires - just the box that has been swapped out

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/27/2021 at 10:35 AM, Sparepart said:

I am looking at the CBS 12 module and thinking how it might work with the components that you will have on the Sierra based car. At the same time I am looking at the circuits on the original fuse box. I grant that much of the original fuse box is devoted to features that are no longer present (e.g Headlamp washer relay, rear wash wipe etc). It seems to me that the CBS 12 is almost too "bare bones", having an absolute minimum of relays and fuses. You might find the CBS 12 is a weak link in having more sophisticated features. For example there is no provision for an intermittent wiper relay, or if you want to run the headlights off a relay to avoid thick wires running to/from the dashboard. I am guessing (just as you have) that the intention was to have the fuel pump powered only with ignition on and to do this via an ignition activated relay. In any case you may well soon find that you have need for another fuse or relay, so I would keep the "extra" module.

I didn't think about that an you may be right I'm finding cables for day time running lights and fog lights so that could explain the extra box. I think ill give it a try wiring everything to the cbs module first and see what happens as tbh i don't need or want daytime running lights and fogs. But I'm starting to think it may be a custom loom now as I've read everyone's posts and the loom sounds totally different all cables seem to be the same and totally different colours. The dash is all custom with separate  indication lights and a warning lights display system of some sort so I'm starting to guess the cbs module was just the start of this wiring to sort the easy bits out. My uncle was a very skilled engineer and mechanic most of the parts in the car were machined by himself even down to some small mounting brackets and bolts so no doubt he would have planned on going all out with the rebuild. Unfortunately not so good for me. The storks are aftermarket aswell not sierra so I'm sure im going to come across many error when i start testing everything.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So had a really good go yesterday for a few hours and I've decided I definitely just going with the cbs mod wiring diagram as most is already done and decide upon the extras' later o will be keeping the extra fuse box and relay box. One thing I've come across most of the wiring is done really ie starter coil alternator etc. But I've got the diagram that i assume came with the cbs 12 as I've found the same diagram in the catalogue under the module. The location for the alternator to go in to the box as a alternator wire in its labeled up but doesn't go straight to the alternator it goes in to the starter and another wire going from starter to alternator. Is this normal i no it may seem like a dumb question. Other than this bit all i have to do really is go ahead and connect all lights hazards up etc. and see what happens.

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is the diagram below what you are talking about?

 

CBS12-Cuircuit-Diagram.thumb.jpg.c81b2ed683f285dd670f4a3dacbf034b.jpg

The wires that you describe are not what I would have expected, however I can see that they might make some sense. There are 3 components at play here, The Battery, The Alternator and The Starter. Electrically, the positive terminals of these three are all connected together. In the above diagram you can see that the battery positive is connected to the starter and then there is a wire from the starter to terminal 6. So terminal 6 is the source of +12 volts for everything else. The Alternator is generating 12 volts and must be connected to the positive terminal of the battery. Using the above circuit the only way that the alternator can feed the battery is for terminal 5 and 6 to be connected. This then would be electrically similar to what you describe, i.e. a wire from 5 to the starter and then on to the alternator. So the Postive terminal on the starter is acting as a common positive terminal. What is most important here is the thickness of the wires, as the starter will take high amps from the battery and the alternator will generate high amps into the battery. Most cars have a seperate very thick, unfused, wire from the battery to the starter, so the postive terminal on the starter can be treated very much like the positive terminal of the battery, it's just that the starter is not as accessible or convenient. Hope this makes sense.

Just a thought, perhaps the intention was to have the battery mounted away from the engine bay, at the rear ? in which case it would make sense to use just one thick cable from the battery to the engine bay and use the starter terminal as the main positive terminal.

 

Edited by Sparepart
Add a thought
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's the diagram it did confuse me a bit . i can see now it really should show a connection between 5 and  6 on the diagram then. I did forgot to mention the cables to alternator and ignition are larger cables the rest are all small. Everything else seems to be ok in accordance to the diagram and what's wired already and labeled up. Other than the fact the cable doesn't go from alternator to module if this as been done and the alternator goes from module to starter thus linking with the 12 volt feed is there a need for the starter to still be wired to terminal 6 as now terminal 5 would be the 12volt feed to everything else or is that still needed for the case of the fuses. 

Thanks it as helped just a few more niggly bits to get my head round and i think ill be there well ready to connect to the battery and watch everything pop lol. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wired up my horn today and it didn't work either. Relay was clicking but no sound. Turns out when the relay was activating it was just connecting the two wires together that I had connected to the horn, no voltage on those wires. I think it is designed for an air horn circuit with a pressure switch, compressor, and a solenoid. I changed the relay wiring to work for my horn, but took me a while to work out what was going on. Works great now. Also works with the ignition off like most cars.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Obviously I do not have a CBS module to test with, however I think that you should find that terms 5 and 6 are connected together inside the module. You can easily check this out, you might even be able to see from the underside if they are the same plate of metal, otherwise use a meter etc. One thing that I have not mentioned before is the circuit protection for everything (bar the starter and alternator) that is powered from the battery. You could think of it as the "main fuse". If you look at the diagram you can see that all the power that is taken from the battery (except that in the thick wire to the starter) will be drawn through the wire connected between the starter and terminal 6. In older cars (pre 1999 say in europe, and most US cars) the wire connecting the battery to all the other electrics (except the starter) is what is call a "Fusible Link". That is to say, the type of metal in the wire, and it's thickness is designed to melt if the current goes over a certain amperage, typically say 60 amps.  So the fusible link is a hidden fuse that protects against major short circuits. Modern european cars actually have a descreet fuse for this frequently to be found close to the battery terminal. Anyway, I hope that you can see that it is preferable to connect the alternator to term 5 and the battery (via the starter) to terminal 6, in this way you can, if you want install a "main" fuse either by using the fusible link from the old donor, or a more modern fuse. Although there is nothing wrong in connecting the battery to term 6 via the starter motor (because of the thick wire from the battery to the starter) it is also perfectly acceptable (and more usual) to connect term 6 directly to the battery positive terminal, either way through a "main" fuse. I hope all this talk of fuses is not con-fusing :-).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not too con-fusing lol. But makes more sense term 6 to starter battery link and keep the alternator at term 5 in to starter and onwards to alternator. I think its the last link in my wiring now before I do anymore work I'm going to check all the cables to make sure there the right strand/ampage although I'm yet to learn how to do that but a bit more reading and ill pick it up hopefully. Ill look in to a Fussible Link and a battery isolator for when its parked up for a few days. After I've done this its on to wiring up all the gauges which i thought had been done  until i took the dash panel of and nothing is connected to I'm guessing there will be more posts when it comes to wiring in warnings and gauges etc.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...