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Robin Hood Exmo, From Barn To Iva


NickandNeil
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Hi all

So we have just bought our first kit car, an unfinished barn find we found out in the depths of Cornwall. My dad and I have been talking about restoring a car for years and as we have both always been big fans of Lotus, so when this came online super cheep we jumped on it.

We are uniquely unqualified for the job, my dad being a kitchen appliance engineer and me a internet technician for Virgin. So we will be happy for any help and advice the forum can give us.

So the basics, it seems to be a Robin Hood EXMO with a 1984 Sierra chassis, a 2L Pinto engine and a lot of work left to do if we ever hope to get it through the IVA. After having a good look over it we are relieved to see that all the work that has been done so far is to a good standard but a lot of things will need to be changed and upgraded to get it on the road. It had been left standing for a long time so three of the breaks were ceased, there are spots of rust all over (but luckily comes with the stainless steel chassis) but are mostly only minor, various electric issues, almost no interior to speak of and an engine that has trouble starting but is mostly fine once running.

Other than that were really exited to get started on this project and will try and give updates as we go for those who are interested. I'll sign off with a few pictures from collection day and if I get time tomorrow i'll try and do a follow up post of pictures and info on the work we have done so far.

Until then its back to the IVA manual for me, am crawling through around page 300 by now.

Cheers

Nick

 

 

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Sadly the full IVA, the licence plate I believe was from the donor car. This one was never actually finished, Its never had repeaters and the electrics and interior were never finished.

About the IVA, is there a reason people want the older Q plates rather than a 2018 plate? Surely that would add value to the car, but would that also mean it needs to adhere to 2018 emissions regulations? Something i'm sure would be difficult with a 34 year old engine.

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Hi Nick,

 

Hey I was the same when I got my Kit Car in June, Don't know much about it all, but since I am changing it's whole image (SEE my Build thread), I am learning a whole lot!!

 

It's fun and very rewarding indeed. :clapping:

 

Do what I did and simply, BELEIVE.

 

It will happen!

 

Mines nearly finished.

 

Dave. 8)

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Welcome and congrats! I built an Exmo with my mate back in the 90s too so will try to help out where I can...

 

Sadly the full IVA, the licence plate I believe was from the donor car. This one was never actually finished, Its never had repeaters and the electrics and interior were never finished.

About the IVA, is there a reason people want the older Q plates rather than a 2018 plate? Surely that would add value to the car, but would that also mean it needs to adhere to 2018 emissions regulations? Something i'm sure would be difficult with a 34 year old engine.

 

No real reason for Q over a normal reg - there is a general thinking that people "turn their nose up" at Q plates because it's a sure-fire indicator of a kit/reconstructed car versus anything genuine. It really is all up to you anyway; if it doesn't bother you, don't worry about it. If you've got no documentation proving the sourcing of the components, you'll be getting one anyway.

 

I say that, but I heard a rumour that Q plates are rarely issued these days anyway, so it might be you still get an age-related plate.

 

Emissions has nothing to do with the registration but the age of the engine. You should have little difficulty with a Pinto proving it's age, even if they don't accept the single donor story related to the J plate (not a Sierra at that age - so a single donor is unlikely). You can relate engine code to year fairly easily.

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About the IVA, is there a reason people want the older Q plates rather than a 2018 plate? Surely that would add value to the car, but would that also mean it needs to adhere to 2018 emissions regulations? Something i'm sure would be difficult with a 34 year old engine.

 

Nobody 'wants' a Q plate, it's assigned if you can't prove engine age. It used to be that a Q plate meant getting through MOT emissions more easily but not so any more.

 

Getting a new 2018 plate is the hard thing to do; you need to prove only one major part is reconditioned and all the other main bits need to be new.

 

Nothing wrong with a Q plate; the only downside is that you can't get a private plate if that was part of the plan...

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It used to be that a Q plate meant getting through MOT emissions more easily but not so any more.

Actually, looks like an MOT on a Q plate is going to be easy - this is from the current MOT manual:

 

You must inspect vehicles with spark ignition engines first used on or after 1 August 1975.

 

For emissions purposes only you should treat the following as first used before 1 August 1975:

 

kit cars and amateur built vehicles first used before 1 August 1998

*bleep*el rotary engined vehicles first used before 1 August 1987

Q plated vehicles

 

 

Tee, hee, see what this forum site has bleeped out :-)

Edited by nelmo
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First of thanks for the response guys that clears up a lot of questions we had.

Secondly here is the promised update. So after having a good lot round the car we have started finding issues already.

We found that we had a leaking radiator which had now been re cored and also upgraded so now has a double core. The old single core would not have been enough to cool setup, which would also explain the second electric fan we found in front of the radiator which was linked to a switch on the dashboard not a thermostat.

We had three seized breaks and sadly only 1 (the left rear drum) was salvageable meaning we needed to get 1 new disk and two calipers for the front as well as the flexible break lines. Fortunately all of the front suspension only took an afternoon of restoration to make them look fresh with only the steering arms and gaiters being replaced.

 

Have added a few more before and after pic for you.

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The rad really is a crap situation in the Exmo, because the front "butress" blocks half of it! See how it goes but in the end we fitted an alternative rad in the actual nosecone, at an angle, in front of the buttress. Still not ideal, but it worked... stick with what you have for now, see if it works, but if it doesn't you have another option at hand... ;)

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Brumster, so far it's looking ok with the new rad, temps have gone down loads so I think we'll keep it as is.

Dave Ed, I'll get some pics tomorrow post them up from you. It's currently on top of the gear box inside the footwell. Have only tried it a couple of times so not sure how well it works.

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